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Using a Sleeve with a Small Male Organ

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Joined: Aug 12, 2016
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In a perfect world, male organ size wouldn’t be any issue for any man: either all men’s equipment would measure the same or else a small male organ would not carry with it the negative social and sensual connotations that it does in our world. But for men who truly do have a small male organ who feel that their size somehow impedes their partner’s enjoyment of coupling, there is an option they can utilize: a male organ sleeve.

About a male organ sleeve

Sometimes also called a male organ sheath, a male organ sleeve is a hollow cylindrical tube that fits over a man’s own member. (Although this article deals with the use of male organ sleeves for the man with a small male organ, men with endowments of any size may in fact use them.) The added width and length of the sleeve can enable a small male organ to function more along the lines of a larger model.

Sometimes a sleeve will physically resemble nothing but a tube. Other times it may be molded to more accurately resemble a real manhood, with a flared head, veins, etc. And in other cases, it may feature other attributes, such as a “ribbed” surface.

Although a male organ sleeve may be made of several different materials, the most common material is silicone or rubber. This allows for the sleeve to be firm but to have some flexibility. If the sleeve is made of silicone rather than, say, metal, it can generally allow for more “give” when a manhood is being inserted into it.

Most sleeves are intended to fit snugly onto the tumescent member, so that they don’t slip off during vigorous coupling or if a man’s tumescence softens during coupling. Some male organ sleeves come with straps which, depending upon their length, are designed either to be wrapped around the balls or to be wrapped around the waist. Sometimes a separate harness can be bought into which a sleeve with no straps can be inserted if the fit is not snug enough.

Suggestions

There are a few things a man may wish to keep in mind when using a male organ sleeve.

• If no straps are provided, it’s important that the sleeve fits snugly around the tumescent member. Finding one that is tight but not too tight may take some trial and error.

• A male organ sleeve is not the same thing as a latex protection; indeed, many sleeves have an opening at both ends, rather than being closed off. A man should put a latex protection over his tumescent manhood before inserting it into the sleeve in order to be assured of proper protection.

• Lubrication is good. Lubricating the exterior of the sleeve is generally a good idea, as – unlike an actual member –a male organ sleeve does not naturally lubricate. Sometimes a man may need to lubricate his member or the interior of the sleeve as well, if the fit is a bit too tight. However, be careful not to over-lubricate, in order to avoid the sleeve slipping during coupling. Some men find that soaking the sleeve in warm water before inserting the tumescent member helps to stretch it out and make manhood insertion easier.

• Be sure to always clean the sleeve after using it. Unless instructions indicate otherwise, warm, soapy water is usually best. And it needs to dry out before being put away.

Using a male organ sleeve may be beneficial to a man with a small male organ, but it’s also important for a manhood (of any size) to be kept in its best health – and using a top drawer male organ health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can help. The best crèmes will include an extensive array of necessary vitamins, such as A, B5, C, D, and E which combine to help maintain male organ health. Also advantageous is a crème that contains L-arginine, an amino acid with neuroprotective properties that can help to prevent loss of male organ sensation due to rough handling.
About author: John Dugan

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common male organ health issues, tips on improving member sensitivity and what to do to maintain a healthy manhood. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.

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