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That Member Rash: Eczema or Psoriasis?

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Joined: Aug 12, 2016
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Presenting the manhood to a partner, especially a new one, is a big moment, and one that guys want to make a big impression. Unfortunately, few things can mar that good impression more than an unsightly member rash. A bedmate is likely to take that member rash as a sign that, at the very least, this guy doesn’t care very much about his manhood health – even if he typically spends a great deal of time on that subject. There are many potential causes of a member rash, including eczema or psoriasis. People use these two terms interchangeably – so how does a guy tell them apart?

Dermatitis

It’s easy to see why people get eczema and psoriasis confused with each other. They are both a form of dermatitis. And what is dermatitis? It’s an inflammation of the skin, which generally causes redness, rashing and itching. Often swelling of some kind is associated with dermatitis. There are many different kinds of dermatitis, not just eczema and psoriasis.

Similarities

So eczema and psoriasis are both relatively common forms of dermatitis. How are they alike?

Well, in the way that they meet the general requirements of dermatitis: they both tend to be marked by a red rash. The rash causes itchiness, and it also tends to be dry. And, of course, they tend to have some itchiness associated with them.

Differences

So they sound similar, but there are significant differences.

Take the itching, for example. Both eczema and psoriasis itch. But in most cases, eczema produces a more intense itch than psoriasis.

In addition, the rash each causes has a different appearance. Eczema tends to present as small blisters or bumps. Psoriasis typically has better-defined edges, and may be scaly and thick. There may be silvery scales associated with the psoriasis rash.

Some of the differences between eczema and psoriasis may are not visible to the eye. Eczema, for example, occurs because of external environmental factors. A guy may have switched laundry detergents and started using one with harsh or unfamiliar chemicals. The member rash that occurs is eczema, a reaction to this harsh chemical.

Psoriasis, on the other hand, is genetic in nature and comes about from a response to something happening inside the body. (Because of the genetic link, it typically occurs in adulthood, while eczema can first appear in childhood.) It is also associated with psoriatic arthritis, a long-term kind of inflammatory arthritis.

Knowing that eczema’s causes tend to be external, a guy can help determine which of these two forms of dermatitis might be responsible for a member rash. If he is wearing new clothes, has come in contact with a new fabric, switched soaps or detergents, etc., it is more likely to be eczema. With the male organ especially, using a new brand of latex protections or seed-blocking foam could be responsible.

While eczema or psoriasis are more likely to appear elsewhere on the body, they can indeed make an unwelcome appearance on the manhood.

Treatment

After a doctor has diagnosed the condition properly, they can recommend the appropriate treatment. Both conditions typically include moisturizing the affected skin, but there may be different approaches as well. For example, eczema often responds to the use of antihistamines, while psoriasis does not.

Whether caused by eczema, psoriasis or another reason, treating a male organ rash is important. In many cases, regular use of a top notch manhood health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can make a difference. Be sure to find a crème that includes a combination of powerful moisturizers, such as natural Shea butter and vitamin E. It helps if the crème also contains vitamin C; this ingredient helps strengthen skin tone, improving the elasticity that male organ skin requires for best functioning.
About author: John Dugan

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common manhood health issues, tips on improving member sensitivity and what to do to maintain a healthy male organ. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.

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